Weekend Feature: New hope for Dyslexics

A brand new computer program has recently been developed in Norway designed to survey pupils' reading difficulties. It is the result of several years research carried out by Professor Torleiv Hoien at the Dyslexia Research Foundation. A brand new computer program has recently been developed in Norway designed to survey pupils' reading difficulties.

It is the result of several years research carried out by Professor Torleiv Hoien at the Dyslexia Research Foundation in Bryne in Rogaland County, VG reports.
As many as 60,000 pupils in Norway may be suffering from the hereditary reading disorder, dyslexia, according to the newspaper.

Thanks to a newly developed computer program, it will now be easier to help these pupils.

During recent months 600 Norwegian pupils in 3rd and 5th grade have tried out the program called Logos.

This program reveals reading and writing difficulties as well as suggests concrete remedial measures to assist the school children.

'The program creates a detailed survey of a pupil's reading difficulties and it can be used at an earlier point of time than is usual in the schools today. Research has already proven how important it is that reading problems are dealt with early', explains Professor Torleiv Hoien who has designed and produced the Logos system.

Logos consists of 17 components each representing a part of the reading process. It will therefore be easy for the testing teacher to notice the pupil's strengths and weaknesses.

'The results of the tests are then presented in simple and straightforward graphs. The results of each simple test are stored for teacher, parent and pupil to compare after the remedial measures have been taken', says Hoien.

By giving Year 3 and 5 pupils 15 minutes remedial reading three times a week, teachers discovered that all pupils made great progress.

Professor Hoien also states that he has received inquiries from USA, Sweden and Denmark concerning the Logos system.

He is extremely keen in spreading the use and knowledge of the program to other countries.

'An important aspect of the program is that we wish to receive test results which will form a unique basis for further research. Provided persons with dyslexia from abroad participate, we will have the opportunity to make direct
comparisons in a way we have never done before', says Hoien.

Dyslexia is considered the most widespread handicap in the western world and it is assumed that between five and ten per cent of the population is affected by this special form of reading and writing disorder.

(VG)
VG reporter Petter Aass
Translated and edited by Amanda Bolsoy

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